Halliburton Wrecks Mexico

Iraq just wasn’t enough for this all-Amerikan giant!

First Iraq, Then the World!
Halliburton Wrecks Mexico

By JOHN ROSS
Macaspana, Tabasco.

The billboard posted along the scrubby highway running east in sultry, southern Tabasco state displays lush jungle, a sun-dappled iguana, and a flock of dazzling macaws. “We’re working for a better environment” the giant road sign radiates.

The leafy graphic contrasts starkly with the blighted scenery of this tropical state whose rivers have been contaminated, the fish envenomed, and the corn fields blasted as the acid rain drips from the polluted sky thanks to the efforts of PEMEX, the national oil monopoly and its multiple transnational sub-contractors–Tabasco holds Mexico’s largest land-based petroleum deposits.

But the billboard here in Macaspana, swampy oil-rich Chontal Indian land, was not posted by the Environmental Secretariat to inspire conservationism or even by PEMEX to burnish its tarnished image. No, this pristine scene is signed off by a familiar U.S. name, in fact PEMEX’s largest subcontractor: Halliburton de Mexico, the Houston-based petroleum industry titan’s south-of-the-border subsidiary. Vice president Dick Cheney’s old mega corps and the largest oil service provider on the planet, has been doing business in Mexico for a score of years.

The privatization of PEMEX, nationalized in 1938 after depression-era president Lazaro Cardenas expropriated Caribbean coast oil enclaves from Anglo-American owners, was right at the heart of Mexico’s still-questioned July 2nd presidential election. Right-winger Felipe Calderon, a former energy secretary, is committed to selling off –or at least entering into joint agreements that would guarantee the contemporary version of the Seven Sisters a substantial quotient of Mexico’s diminishing reserves (only 10 more years according to the worst case scenario.)

Read the rest of it here.

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